THE ULTIMATE DIY HANDBOOK
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 33

Thread: Plywood/acrylic 8'L x 26W x 36"H Build

  1. #1
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like

    Plywood/acrylic 8'L x 26W x 36"H Build

    Hello,
    After reading all the issues with getting acrylic and plywood to seal well since silicone doesn't bond well and is just a gasket, I knew I needed to use some wood working tricks to get to work and not leak.

    So I am thinking about this modified dove tail to mechanically hold the acrylic in place so I will get a great seal.

    all of this is 1" both the acrylic and the plywood to keep it strong and simple with the measurements.

    screenshot-68.jpg

    The basic layout


    screenshot-69.jpg

    Here you can see the dovetail, I will weld on a 45 degree piece to create the tail and cut the plywood to a 45 degree to make the dove.



    screenshot-70.jpg


    screenshot-67.jpg

    The last pic here with the plywood removed and viewing from the back shows how the bottom of the acrylic is dovetail joined also.

    screenshot-66.jpg


    Well that is the plan so far. I will continue to do the mock up in sketch up. Never used this program before so there is a bit of a learning curve and it is all up hill...

  2. #2
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    The silicone still won't bond to the acrylic, so that seam is still going to leak at some point, or worse blow out sideways when the silicone gives way... If you want to use acrylic you need a mechanical 'clamp' and 'gasket' type seal, using some type of mechanical fasteners that keep constant pressure on the seal...

    Also note that your 1" acrylic is drastically undersized for a 36" tall by 96" long 'unbraced' tank as pictured, you need minimum 2" acrylic at those dimensions, or about 1 3/8" or 1 1/2" acrylic if braced properly...

    Using glass will save you a lot of grief as well as cost...

  3. #3
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    The silicone still won't bond to the acrylic, so that seam is still going to leak at some point, or worse blow out sideways when the silicone gives way... If you want to use acrylic you need a mechanical 'clamp' and 'gasket' type seal, using some type of mechanical fasteners that keep constant pressure on the seal...

    Also note that your 1" acrylic is drastically undersized for a 36" tall by 96" long 'unbraced' tank as pictured, you need minimum 2" acrylic at those dimensions, or about 1 3/8" or 1 1/2" acrylic if braced properly...

    Using glass will save you a lot of grief as well as cost...
    Hey Meep,

    I was wondering after I posted if someone would say something. There will be at least 1.5" overlap piece that mechanically pushes the acrylic into the dovetail.

    I just haven't added those yet to the drawing. But you are for sure right about it blowing out otherwise.

    It will be euro braced, and I know I am at the edge of safety with the 1", but cost is an issue.

    I may make the bottom support thicker so it rides up higher on the glass since I will have about 3-4" of substrate for the under gravel system. This should help with the stress issues as it will reduce the actual height that the acrylic will have to support.

    From reading this forum for the past few weeks, it figures it would be you to point out the issues of the image..

    Thanks for being observant,
    Later

  4. #4
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ThomasC4 Click here to enlarge
    It will be euro braced, and I know I am at the edge of safety with the 1", but cost is an issue.
    IMO 1" is not on the edge, it's not sufficient at that depth and in that design, again my opinion... Even braced the 1" is going to flex and bow quite a bit at that depth and span and that excess bowing and flex will put a lot of unwanted stress on the plywood to acrylic junction... Also may I suggest that you not be penny wise and dollar silly at this junction, saving a few bucks now that could realistically cost you $1000s in repairs and/or a pile of broken useless tank parts and a total loss of your fish, IMO is not worth it...

    May I ask the adversity to glass? Even after getting glass professionally cut and edged it will be cheaper than acrylic...

  5. #5
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    IMO 1" is not on the edge, it's not sufficient at that depth and in that design, again my opinion... Even braced the 1" is going to flex and bow quite a bit at that depth and span and that excess bowing and flex will put a lot of unwanted stress on the plywood to acrylic junction... Also may I suggest that you not be penny wise and dollar silly at this junction, saving a few bucks now that could realistically cost you $1000s in repairs and/or a pile of broken useless tank parts and a total loss of your fish, IMO is not worth it...

    May I ask the adversity to glass? Even after getting glass professionally cut and edged it will be cheaper than acrylic...
    Yes you may.
    Yes glass will be cheaper but it also weighs 160lbs for the sheet which is more than I can manage safely by myself.

    The 1" not being sufficient? don't know. I have seen tanks made out of 1" that are 600 gallons //youtu.be/mdtpTkzQgfA this video he says his tanks are made out of 1" acrylic.

    Thanks for the input it is something I will have to consider.

    Later

  6. #6
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ThomasC4 Click here to enlarge
    The 1" not being sufficient? don't know. I have seen tanks made out of 1" that are 600 gallons //youtu.be/mdtpTkzQgfA this video he says his tanks are made out of 1" acrylic.
    The number of gallons is irrelevant, the depth almost exclusively dictates the thickness of the acrylic or glass needed, with length coming in a distant 2nd, unless it's some stupid long tank, then length comes into play more, especially with acrylic...

    If your reference in the video is to the first tank he talks about he says the depth is 32 inches, that makes all the difference, at 32" depth 1" acrylic (with a full solid acrylic top brace as his tank has) will suffice, but at 36" as you describe without the full top brace and/or if using eurobracing (that is not as good of a brace as a full top) 1" is no longer sufficient, yes that extra 4" of depth and lack of a full one piece braced top makes all the difference in this equation... Eurobracing will certainly help on a acrylic tank, but it's better suited for glass builds as they flex and blow much less by nature and generally don't need as much bracing... This is why you see almost all custom acrylic tank builders using one piece tops with cut outs, that type of 6 sided sheet acrylic cube build is just that much stronger and allows for the small step down in acrylic thickness they use...

    When you are building a hybrid tank like you intend, you have to factor in that the acrylic and the plywood are not going to bend/bow/warp equally and be fully tied together with 'welds' essentially making them one as seen in a full acrylic build... This is what is going to cause you problems, the plywood back doubled up as you have pictured will bow very, very little, but the the front panel of the tank is going to bow significantly especially if you under size the acrylic, this will put all sorts of extra force and uneven forces on the plywood to acrylic seams, and they are true mechanical seams, unlike the welded joints found in a full acrylic build...

    You are of course welcome to do what you feel is good enough, but I would hate to see you drop a huge chunk of money only to end it disappointment because you were not advised of the potential issues...

  7. #7
    DIYFK member BigDaddyK's Avatar


    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Niagara Region
    Posts
    381
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have to ask, is there reason you are using plywood at all? Meep knows his stuff and while we sometimes have a difference of opinion, I have to agree that plywood and acrylic is simply a bad combination. I know that the costs will change substantially so if that's the reason fair enough, but think about the potential water damage from a tank that size!! Front end foresight beats Back end suffering every time Click here to enlarge

  8. #8
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Thanks for the reply Meep.

    So if I am reading your advice correctly I need to lower the height of the tank?

    Even if I have bracing up 4" on the bottom of the acrylic which would make it only 32" from the top for the 1" acrylic you still think that I am pushing it?


    I am also not planning on using tube silicone at this time. I am leaning more towards a silicone strip that is placed in as one long gasket and then the mechanical force seals it.


    On another point. Can acrylic be butt jointed end to end with weld on 4 say, So that you can make a unibody top out of pieces? I have seen one guy do it but that was for the viewing wall of the tank and it was a super long tank, he said there was only a slight viewing distortion. But if this is possible then out of the pieces that I was going to use to euro brace I could make a uni top which would alleviate your other concern.

    Thanks for taking the time.
    Later

  9. #9
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by BigDaddyK Click here to enlarge
    I have to ask, is there reason you are using plywood at all? Meep knows his stuff and while we sometimes have a difference of opinion, I have to agree that plywood and acrylic is simply a bad combination. I know that the costs will change substantially so if that's the reason fair enough, but think about the potential water damage from a tank that size!! Front end foresight beats Back end suffering every time Click here to enlarge
    Hey BDK,
    Yeah it is cheaper $ wise.

    Well I have made a few things wood working and acrylic can be worked just like wood. Which is why using dove tailing joints will make them extremely strong and they get stronger with pressure since they use the mechanical force for strength. I personally believe that once it is set up and all the force is placed on it the water seal will be fine. I could be wrong but that is part of the reason for throwing this build out there to be scrutinized by others who have more experience with some of this. You really can't offend me by saying "this is a dumb idea" since if it is, it is.

    I priced out a new 96" x 24 x 24 acrylic for $1980 from a 3hr away (one way) manufacturer and that is me going to pick it up.

    I like acrylics clarity and I like the upright seams much better than the glass aquariums.

    Thanks for the reply,
    Later

  10. #10
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Okay I made a few changes.

    I lowered the height of the tank to 32" of acrylic, which comes to only 30" of unsupported acrylic bearing water.

    screenshot-76.jpg


    Now I have the mechanical bracing that I need to hold the acrylic into the dovetail joints.

    screenshot-78.jpg



    So this is the mock up then... Any other suggestions.. An all acrylic aquarium that is 96x 24x 30" tall is $3150.20

    If this works I will have it for a little over half..

    screenshot-75.jpg



    screenshot-73.jpg

  11. #11
    DIYFK member JarmFace's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Screwing into plywood edges is pretty weak. You need a solid wood to sink screws into. In boat building we use cleats for this exact purpose.

  12. #12
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by JarmFace Click here to enlarge
    Screwing into plywood edges is pretty weak. You need a solid wood to sink screws into. In boat building we use cleats for this exact purpose.
    Hey Jarmface,

    Do you have an example of these cleats?

    Thanks for the reply
    Later

  13. #13
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    I'm not a fan of butt seams, even in chemically welded things like acrylic as they are hard to do right...

    BUT, done properly butt seams or any seam for that matter in acrylic should be nearly as strong as a solid piece... But that all assumes they are done properly, no air bubbles and a perfect weld job... If done properly they should also be very close to optically unidentifiable, and nearly as strong as a solid sheet...

    To do this you have to have a 'perfect' fit, that means dead on polished or near polished and true edges that align perfectly, you need to apply the cement perfectly and apply the perfect amount of pressure... To much pressure or not perfect fit will cause air bubbles and weaken the joint, too much pressure and you will squish out too much cement and also get spider webbing and that will weaken the joint...

    I'm sure you can get great seams with Weldon 4, but most pros will use pure methelene chloride, it's harder to work with because it evaporates near instantly so it's not really a DIY friendly item, but overall it's what most pro shops will use to bond acrylic... It's the primary solvent in Weldon 4 but they also add other solvents to retard the evaporation rate... Most shops use the pin and syringe method for seams, with custom jigs to hold alignment and proper pressure... Beyond that I can't give much hands on advice as my experience is limited to small (and low cost) stuff... For me personally I was going to spend $1000s on the acrylic I would probably bite the bullet and have a pro do the job an let them assume the liability for a bad seam, unlike glass and silicone that you can, fudge the fit, have ample work time and worst case take apart and redo... With acrylic you have limited work time, you have to have a dead on fit for a good seam, you have limited to no work time and you really don't get a do over with acrylic...

    I would advise you take any and all scrap pieces you have and practice, practice and practice some more on seaming... Even possibly do a few dry runs of your acrylic with distilled water as your fake cement, to get a hang for what how it goes, and I do wish you the best of luck...

    Also, based on your drawing, how do you intend on attaching the acrylic top to the plywood back?

  14. #14
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ThomasC4 Click here to enlarge
    Hey Jarmface,

    Do you have an example of these cleats?

    Thanks for the reply
    Later
    I'll let JarmFace expand upon their ideas, but you might consider a solid full length spline joint, that is 1/3 the thickness of the plywood and recessed half way into the plywood thickness... And of course use a top of the line high lamination count cabinet grade plywood, as voids and low lamination count plywood will cause a weak joint. especially if you are cutting groves/dadoing into it...

  15. #15
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    I'm not a fan of butt seams, even in chemically welded things like acrylic as they are hard to do right...

    BUT, done properly butt seams or any seam for that matter in acrylic should be nearly as strong as a solid piece... But that all assumes they are done properly, no air bubbles and a perfect weld job... If done properly they should also be very close to optically unidentifiable, and nearly as strong as a solid sheet...

    To do this you have to have a 'perfect' fit, that means dead on polished or near polished and true edges that align perfectly, you need to apply the cement perfectly and apply the perfect amount of pressure... To much pressure or not perfect fit will cause air bubbles and weaken the joint, too much pressure and you will squish out too much cement and also get spider webbing and that will weaken the joint...

    I'm sure you can get great seams with Weldon 4, but most pros will use pure methelene chloride, it's harder to work with because it evaporates near instantly so it's not really a DIY friendly item, but overall it's what most pro shops will use to bond acrylic... It's the primary solvent in Weldon 4 but they also add other solvents to retard the evaporation rate... Most shops use the pin and syringe method for seams, with custom jigs to hold alignment and proper pressure... Beyond that I can't give much hands on advice as my experience is limited to small (and low cost) stuff... For me personally I was going to spend $1000s on the acrylic I would probably bite the bullet and have a pro do the job an let them assume the liability for a bad seam, unlike glass and silicone that you can, fudge the fit, have ample work time and worst case take apart and redo... With acrylic you have limited work time, you have to have a dead on fit for a good seam, you have limited to no work time and you really don't get a do over with acrylic...

    I would advise you take any and all scrap pieces you have and practice, practice and practice some more on seaming... Even possibly do a few dry runs of your acrylic with distilled water as your fake cement, to get a hang for what how it goes, and I do wish you the best of luck...

    Also, based on your drawing, how do you intend on attaching the acrylic top to the plywood back?
    Meep,

    I was thinking most of what you posted.
    I could just send a drawing of just the acrylic to a shop with all the measurements and see what they give me for a quote. Because you are right they assume the liability to make a perfect seam, and I bet they will.

    I was thinking of practicing with water also. I have some 90 clamps for corners so I will use them for the big welds, as for the end to end butt welds I was planing on a lot of practice.. You only get one chance...


    I was thinking of attaching a tab of acrylic that hooks over the edge and then gets screwed to the back.. as well as a few screws in from the top.

    I am going to be doing another drawing with a slightly different way of attaching the acrylic to the plywood. It will be easier on the install but maybe not as much on the fabrication of the acrylic since it will have many small welds.

    Thanks for the info I couldn't find but one thing on the web about butt welding on the ends.

    I'll post the drawing as soon as I get it done, it will give you something to laugh about..

    Later

  16. #16
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    I have some 90 clamps for corners so I will use them for the big welds
    Be careful, it's far to easy to apply too much pressure, you basically just want enough pressure to hold it together, not actually clamp it together... If you do some practice runs and find yourself with spider webbing in the seams, you likely used too much pressure...

  17. #17
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    Be careful, it's far to easy to apply too much pressure, you basically just want enough pressure to hold it together, not actually clamp it together... If you do some practice runs and find yourself with spider webbing in the seams, you likely used too much pressure...
    Meep,
    They are just the kind that hold it at 90 no pressure..

    Just lost 2 hours + worth of work on sketch up.Click here to enlarge

    Thanks
    Later

  18. #18
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ThomasC4 Click here to enlarge
    Just lost 2 hours + worth of work on sketch up.Click here to enlarge
    I never had the patience for SketchUp but it does have an auto-save feature, enable it Click here to enlarge Also enable the backup option so you have a backup of the last save point to fall back to if a file corrupts or you mess something up real bad...

  19. #19
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    I never had the patience for SketchUp but it does have an auto-save feature, enable it Click here to enlarge Also enable the backup option so you have a backup of the last save point to fall back to if a file corrupts or you mess something up real bad...
    auto save only works if the program crashes, not because you are an idiot and close and don't save..Click here to enlarge

  20. #20
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by ThomasC4 Click here to enlarge
    auto save only works if the program crashes, not because you are an idiot and close and don't save..

    Backing up a SketchUp file or restoring an Auto-save file
    SketchUp creates a backup file the second time you successfully save your SketchUp file and any subsequent saves. This file is an exact copy of the previously saved version of the file. The backup file uses the naming convention FILENAME.skb on Windows and FILENAME~.skp on OS X, and it's located in the same folder as the original file.


    By default, SketchUp automatically saves your files every five minutes while you're actively working. If, for example, you're working on a file named FILENAME.skp, the automatic save creates a file named AutoSave_FILENAME.skp. The auto-save file is kept until you successfully save your original file or specifically confirm that you don't want to save changes. If SketchUp crashes while you're working on a model the auto-save file is not deleted. You can recover your work from the point the last auto-save was performed by opening the auto-save file in the same location as your original file. If you've never saved your work the auto-save file is stored in your "My Documents" folder.
    Even with an accidental shut down the autosave file should still be there to recover from, that is unless you specifically clicked the 'do not save changes' upon shutdown... But, even then you can probably recover the file, with some basic and free deleted file recovery software...


  21. #21
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    Even with an accidental shut down the autosave file should still be there to recover from, that is unless you specifically clicked the 'do not save changes' upon shutdown... But, even then you can probably recover the file, with some basic and free deleted file recovery software...

    I specifically did.


    But this program is going to have me go postal.


    Well here is the latest version..

    The tabs will be either screwed or bolted.

    screenshot-82.jpg

    screenshot-81.jpg

  22. #22
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    With all those tabs, you are going to have to be very careful in planning tolerances and how much epoxy coating you seal the wood with, so when you assemble everything fits as it should, as an extra heavy coat of epoxy in one tab area could lead to an avalanche of headaches... IMO you would almost need to route out or mill out all those tabbed recesses in the plywood after a generous coating of epoxy to make sure they are uniform, true and flat to each other so that when you assemble the acrylic you don't put undo strain or tweak the acrylic... Plus now you have all those screw holes/bolt holes that are a potential point of leakage and that could lead to big problems if you don't also epoxy coat and seal the hole for the bolt preventing any water leakage from contacting unprotected wood...

    IMO you are creating more work and an exponentially higher potential for more problems both in assembly and down the line with said design....

  23. #23
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    With all those tabs, you are going to have to be very careful in planning tolerances and how much epoxy coating you seal the wood with, so when you assemble everything fits as it should, as an extra heavy coat of epoxy in one tab area could lead to an avalanche of headaches... IMO you would almost need to route out or mill out all those tabbed recesses in the plywood after a generous coating of epoxy to make sure they are uniform, true and flat to each other so that when you assemble the acrylic you don't put undo strain or tweak the acrylic... Plus now you have all those screw holes/bolt holes that are a potential point of leakage and that could lead to big problems if you don't also epoxy coat and seal the hole for the bolt preventing any water leakage from contacting unprotected wood...

    IMO you are creating more work and an exponentially higher potential for more problems both in assembly and down the line with said design....

    Hey Meep,

    My thought was that with a gasket that runs along the outside bottom edge it would ensure water tightness. Just the weight of the acrylic with the fasteners would squeeze enough to make the seal. I can also run the seal around the bottom edge of tabs.

    Both the bottom and back plywood pieces will be sealed on 5 sides, before the acrylic is attached.

    The bolts or screws I don't see as a big deal being pre drilled and filled with water sealer at time of sealing and screwing.

    I figured if I did do it this way the ways to go is to make all the acrylic and then use it as the pattern for the wood to ensure the best tolerances.

    I don't know if I am going to use an epoxy, I am leaning towards a rubber sealer if I can find a fish safe one, this will also compress and give a little, I can also file an edge or two on the acrylic when the final pre fitting is being done to compensate for any water sealer build up in a corner or two.

    I will take my time with the sealing to get even coats.

    The more I do some figuring I maybe better off just having it built.

    But I do enjoy the mental gymnastics of trying to solve the problems.

    Thanks,
    Later

  24. #24
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    Another potential issue I see with the tabs is now you have 6 small tabs holding the entire acrylic assembly to the plywood back of the tank, if even one fails it's bound to leak or worse... If you are determined to do it this way, why not turn all those tabs into a full length solid strip, doing this you avoid all the individual pockets and get a structurally stronger design overall... Also doing the full strip gets you a lower euro style brace that will help prevent bowing or pressure points, especially across the front...

    I'm still not a fan of the idea, though...

  25. #25
    DIYFK member Warfie's Avatar


    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    73
    Post Thanks / Like
    Rebuilding the wheel here... Listen to Meep, don't cause more headaches than it's worth...

  26. #26
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Meep Click here to enlarge
    Another potential issue I see with the tabs is now you have 6 small tabs holding the entire acrylic assembly to the plywood back of the tank, if even one fails it's bound to leak or worse... If you are determined to do it this way, why not turn all those tabs into a full length solid strip, doing this you avoid all the individual pockets and get a structurally stronger design overall... Also doing the full strip gets you a lower euro style brace that will help prevent bowing or pressure points, especially across the front...

    I'm still not a fan of the idea, though...
    It would be held from the top also to the back of the tank.
    Yeah I thought of that while I was sketching it up, one strip.

    I have one other idea yet that I will mock up.. A tounge and grove style.

    Thanks
    Later

  27. #27
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Click here to enlarge Originally Posted by Warfie Click here to enlarge
    Rebuilding the wheel here... Listen to Meep, don't cause more headaches than it's worth...
    I'm going to make a breakthrough in design Click here to enlarge that will be talked about for generations of fish keepers.

    If I am not sure it will work I won't do it. I may just sell something and buy the tank if I have to.

    Many options...

    Still researching...

    Thanks
    Later

  28. #28
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Okay guys,
    I may have a solution to the acrylic bonding issue.


    I have put this product in my own basement because when I bought the place it had water issues. Since applying it I have had NONE... It is called sani-tred.

    Here is a before and after image.

    PICT0505.jpg


    finalbasement.jpg

    So I contacted them about their product and here is there response take it for what it is worth.

    I will test their claim that it will bond with acrylic via samples.
    screenshot-84.jpg


    screenshot-85.jpg

    screenshot-86.jpg


    screenshot-87.jpg

    screenshot-88.jpg


    So I am going to try it..

  29. #29
    DIYFK member Meep's Avatar


    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    2,908
    Post Thanks / Like
    I would personally not trust this application long term and submerged, sure it might hold short term, but long term? I have seen my fair share of 2 part epoxies fail on acrylic, it's a weak mechanical bond, thus the reason they tell you to scratch up the surface to get just that much more of a mechanical bond... There are some 'plastic' epoxies out there that combine a solvent in them that creates a pseudo chemical and mechanical bond, but I have seen those fail as well... I repaired my moms pool skimmer with said 'plastic epoxy', dremeled out a nice rough V groove, and applied the plastic epoxy, it lasted 2 seasons before it started to release and fail... Not a big deal when it fails and the leak is outdoors into the lawn...

    Since the company outlined and specified this application, I would ask them if they will back up their prescribed application and use with a written warranty and guarantee if it leaks down the road, their answer is likely to be very revealing...

  30. #30
    DIYFK member ThomasC4's Avatar


    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Okay to anyone following this I have made some changes. You all have talked me out of using acrylic. Just to many unknown, not well tested acrylic bonding factors.

    I have watched every video on building a plywood glass aquarium on youtube.

    So here is my sketch up of the new model I have left the glass out of the images there are 2 type of plywood " and a layer of " that will create a frame for the " glass to go in. This should create a very smooth inside of the tank with no edges. I think you can figure out were the glass will go.



    I have put this angle on it because if I ever wanted to move it to the other place in my house that it would fit and look good it has to have that corner gone. I also want that corner gone for were I will be putting because of the high traffic.

    So tell me what you think.

    screenshot-105.jpg


    screenshot-104.jpg


    screenshot-101.jpg



    screenshot-103.jpg


    screenshot-102.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails screenshot-99.jpg  

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •